German

Students gain fluency and advanced reading comprehension; study prominent works of German literature in their original language; and examine Germany’s history, culture, politics, and contemporary society. Majors complete eight upper-level courses and study abroad in Germany, Austria, or Switzerland. Course offerings include Advanced Conversation and Problem Solving, Kafka and His Times, The Nazi Period, and Literature and Culture of Fairy Tales.

Students in the department have access to the German House—which offers housing and cultural events—exchange programs, scholarships through the Federation of German-American clubs, and internships in Germany.

Upcoming Events

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News

Deadline to sign up for Summer in Berlin is December 1st
November 18, 2014
The “Summer in Berlin” program consist of a three-week language course at the DiD German language institute in Berlin where students take language classes along with other international students. The program this year will run from June 15-July 4, 2015. Make sure to get your application turned in by December 1, 2014
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Double your chance to speak German!
October 20, 2014
To accommodate everyone's schedules, the German Table will now be held twice a week: every Monday and Tuesday at noon on the balcony of McClurg. You do not need to be fluent in German to attend. It is a great time to just listen and see how many words you do catch or whether or not you can get the gist of the conversation. Students, faculty, staff, and community members who share a love of German Culture and the German language are encouraged to attend.
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Dr. Apgar presents at the German Studies Association Conference
October 17, 2014
Dr. Apgar presented a paper in September at the German Studies Association conference in Kansas City. His paper, entitled "Forest on a Shelf: Authenticity and Schildbach's Holzbibliothek," investigated the connection between society and the forest at the end of the 18th century.
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